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This page displays information about the major you selected and helps you identify the community colleges where you can fulfill major preparation requirements.

University Majors


San Francisco State University
Family and Consumer Sciences B.A.

The Bachelor of Arts in Family and Consumer Sciences major enables a student to specialize in one of two subject areas, or to generalize in family and consumer sciences with the option of taking the subject matter preparation courses for the Single Subject Credential, which prepares one for teaching in family and consumer sciences secondary education programs. The common core of the Bachelor of Arts is devoted to students acquiring an understanding of family relations/child growth and development; management dynamics; food and nutrition, apparel design and merchandising, and interior design/housing as solutions to the physical, social, and psychological needs of individuals and families; sensitivities to the needs and value systems of individuals, families, and groups which vary by age, socio-economic status, and ethnic heritage; and the role expectations of professional family and consumer scientists. Students pursuing this major, depending upon their areas of specialization, may complete field experiences in business, education, industry, government, or private agencies. These field experiences serve as integrating experiences for students prior to their entry into professional roles.

  Click here to read more about this major on the campus web site.
  CSU GE-Breadth/IGETC recommended for this major? Yes
Click here to learn more about CSU GE-Breadth.
Click here to learn more about IGETC for CSU.

Choose a California Community College to see course articulation information related to this major at this and nearby community colleges.

 


 

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